The Bizarre Encounters and Emergency Extractions From ENT Doctors

Join Dr. Undavia, Dr. Reddy, and Dr. Smith from NJENT & Facial Plastic Surgery as they share jaw-dropping stories of the weirdest foreign bodies they’ve encountered in the ear, nose, and throat. From dentures to cockroaches, these medical experts reveal the extraordinary challenges they’ve faced in extracting the unimaginable. Discover the unexpected, the emergencies, and the important lessons on what not to put in your ear, nose, or throat.

What you’ll learn

  • What are some of NJENT’s firsthand accounts of emergency procedures to remove foreign bodies.
  • How button batteries and other potentially harmful objects can be life-threatening if not removed.
  • Why these essential lessons can help you avoid risky practices and protecting your ear, nose, and throat health.

 

Listen now for all your ear, nose, or throat matters and get insights from the experts. For professional ENT support, schedule a consultation today at our Marlton, New Jersey location by visiting NJENT.com or call 609-710-NOES (6673).

Listen to the audio version below.

Audio Transcript:

Dr. Undavia:
Hey guys, Dr. Undavia, Dr. Reddy, Dr. Smith from NJENT Facial Plastic Surgery. We wanted to bring you a short video today about the craziest things that we’ve taken out of the ear, nose, and throat. Um, foreign bodies, sometimes they’re in the emergency room. Sometimes they’re here. Sometimes they’re in the operating room. So I’m going to start first with the throat. This is a patient who unfortunately was demented. He had been tolerating things by mouth and throat at the nursing home for a few months, but slowly over the past couple of months, the amount of food and amount of liquids that he was tolerating, it slowly declined in about a week before he got admitted to the hospital. All he could have was very little sips of water. And he wasn’t communicating with anybody. And he hadn’t for months and months and months. So they just didn’t know what the reason was. So they brought him in. And in usual fashion in the emergency room, they do their full workup. They did an x-ray for whatever reason. Actually, I think they did a chest x-ray to start with and the first thing they see is something up here. So then they focused in on the x-ray here and it was his dentures. So the dentures got caught in there. So I got a phone call from the GI doc who first tried to go in there and take it out and said the dentures are stuck. So we took, we took him to the operating room. We could not get a breathing room, a breathing tube in because the dentures had been in there for months. Once we found out after asking how long the dentures had been missing. It had been months and the dentures, they have like these little metal prongs. They had integrated into the arytenoids, into the voice box and they were now there. And so I tried for, I mean, it must’ve been an hour and a half to two hours of trying to get it out through the mouth and we couldn’t do it. So I had to transfer him and he had to have something called a partial laryngectomy. He had to have part of his voice box removed just to get this foreign body out.

Dr. Smith:
Wow. I’ve done dentures but only a partial denture. Partial denture. It was immediate, not that long.

Dr. Undavia:
It was insane. And the guy was cacthetic. He literally had lost so much weight. That was a crazy story. That is crazy. Dr. Reddy?

Dr. Reddy:
So for the ears, this is something that you guys have all seen but not maybe super crazy for us but probably crazy for our listeners. But I had a patient where you know, she went to sleep one night, and then the next morning she woke up with a weird sensation in her ear, and she felt like a fluttering sensation sometimes in her ear, and sometimes like these little sharp bouts of pain. And so she came in, we took a look in the ear, and there was a cockroach. So at first she said that there wasn’t any cockroaches in the apartment. So the way we got the cockroach out was it was you know, it’s pretty, it was stuck in there pretty good. It was pretty big size because cockroaches can kind of like squeeze themselves in the tight openings and kind of get in there. And so first, the first step was just, um, killing the cockroach.

Dr. Undavia:
How’d you do that?

Dr. Reddy:
So we put some, um, lidocaine, topical lidocaine medication in there. And basically the cockroach just dies. And then we just kind of have to remove it piecemeal. It was just kind of gross.

Dr. Smith:
Yeah. It had a couple of those too.

Dr. Reddy:
Yeah, not fun.

Dr. Smith:
No. Bees are bad too. I’ve had a little kid with a yellow jacket in their ear. In the ER, that was also not fun. Insects tend to fall apart when you try to grab them out of there. The same thing, drowned it with viscous lidocaine and then took it out afterwards.

Dr. Undavia:
On a forum of ours, we have one doc posted that he had a brown recluse spider in the ear and it had created a web and everything. So he looked in, he saw the spider on the web and he knew it was a brown recluse, I would not know that it was a brown recluse. I would just run, I’m sorry. All the patients watching and listening, I’m sorry.

Dr. Smith:
I think the craziest thing that I’ve ever gotten out of it here was something we couldn’t see what it was and then after I grabbed it, pulled it out, it was one of those little googly eyes that you would stick on a craft project. Like I flipped it over and looked at it and it was like an eye. Kids often are responsible for a lot of crazy foreign bodies. I think the craziest or the weirdest thing I took out of someone’s nose, I think we’ve actually had a couple patients that have had a couple weird things in the nose, but a Lego head. I had a kid that shoved a Lego head and got that stuck up between the turbinates in the nose and that was a little bit difficult to get out.

Dr. Undavia:
I had a four-year-old that put batteries on her nose. She put two, one on each side and it was a horrible mess. She ended up having a septal perforation. She, and you can’t reconstruct that at four. So, uh, she just has no septum inside of her nose. I’m sure it bleeds and crusts and hurts. I felt terrible for her. Those are emergencies. So, foreign bodies that are emergencies are typically

Dr. Smith:
Yeah, button disc batteries. So those are why there’s all those labels and stickers on all those button and disc batteries that prevent, it can happen in the ear and the throat and the nose, but in any of those locations, it’s absolutely a medical emergency to get those out ASAP. So we’re hearing aid batteries. Hearing aid batteries are common. Yep, absolutely.

Dr. Undavia:
Yeah, we tend to see a ton of hearing aid parts in the ear all day, whether it’s the ear piece that goes in, the rubber stuff, the battery. Yeah. The most, the most common foreign body we probably see are Q-tips.

Dr. Smith:
Yeah. The heads of the Q-tip. So the craziest foreign body, I think we’ve taken out from a nose. I think you had one, I had one, you may have had one at some point, but a tooth in the nose. Um, finding a tooth inside the nasal cavity is something that you don’t typically think of finding, but, um, I think there’s a couple of times every once in a while you get some abnormal growth in the nose that ends up being like a tooth or. Yeah.

Dr. Undavia:
Anyways, this is a short segment. We just wanted to show you some of the crazy stuff we brought. Don’t put anything in your ear, nose, or throat, ever, especially Q-tips. Follow us for more content.

Dr. Reddy:
Nothing smaller than your elbow.

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